Casandra

1940s-theme-photo-shoot-in-riverside


When my buddy Steve Fetbrandt dreamed up the idea of doing a 1940s photoshoot over a long 3-day-weekend last Labor Day, I have to admit, I felt out of my element.

He told me to google “noir” and said I should be able to find tons of pictures that fit that description.

When my buddy Steve Fetbrandt dreamed up the idea of doing a 1940s photoshoot over a long 3-day-weekend last Labor Day, I have to admit, I felt out of my element.

He told me to google “noir” and said I should be able to find tons of pictures that fit that description.

As a news photographer I always prided myself to being a competent generalist so I went along, as did my former colleague Rigo Peña.

Even though I didn’t know anything about the period attire, I was confident I could fake it.

We recruited 4 models, got the help of a hair stylist and a makeup artist and a stylist who helped with the clothes.

We even enlisted a local car enthusiasts club who called themselves “Old Farts Racing Team” to let us use their cars as props in front of the historic Riverside Superior Courthouse.

Here’s what I came up with.

To get an idea of what the scene looked like, mouse over the pictures to see the originals as they appear out of the camera.

Equipment

I used to 2 Speedlites in these pictures.

The main or key light was a 600-EX-RT inside a small Photoflex Octodome.

The 2nd Speedlite, also a 600-EX-RT, was fitted with a Honl Grid to control the light spill and focus it on my subjects heads to provide separation most of the time.

Ambient light was not a factor since the sun had already set and we were in the shadows of buildings.

  • 2 Canon 600-EX-RT Speedlites
  • 1 STE-3-RT transmitter
  • 2 lightstands
  • 1 extra small Photoflex Octodome
  • 1 Honl Grid Spot modifier
  • Canon 5DMark2 with 100mm, 50mm, 70-200mm zoom

Post production

All camera raw images were converted in .dng on import.

I generally don’t do a lot of post production except burn, dodge and crop.

This time, I had to get into the spirit of the time period.

So once the images were imported into Lightroom 5, I just tried the color presets that came with it.

As a news photographer I always prided myself to being a competent generalist so I went along, as did my former colleague photographer Rigo Peña.

Even though I didn’t know anything about the period attire, I was confident I could fake it.

We recruited 4 models, got the help of a hair stylist and a makeup artist and a stylist who helped with the clothes.

We even enlisted a local car enthusiasts club who called themselves “Old Farts Racing Team” to let us use their cars as props in front of the historic Riverside Superior Courthouse.

Here’s what I came up with.

Mouseover the pictures to see the originals as they appear out of the camera.

Equipment

I used to 2 Speedlites in these pictures.

The main or key light was a 600-EX-RT inside a small Photoflex Octodome.

The 2nd Speedlite, also a 600-EX-RT, was fitted with a Honl Grid to control the light spill and focus it on my subjects heads to provide separation most of the time.

Ambient was not a factor since the sun had already set for the most part.

  • 2 Canon 600-EX-RT Speedlites
  • 2 Lumedyne Supercycler battery packs
  • 1 STE-3-RT transmitter
  • 2 lightstands
  • 1 extra small Photoflex Octodome
  • 1 Honl Grid Spot modifier
  • Canon 5DMark2 with 100mm, 50mm, 70-200mm zoom

Post production


I generally don’t do a lot of post production except burn, dodge and crop.

This time, I had to get into the spirit of the time period.

So once the images were imported into Lightroom 5, I just tried the color presets that came with it.

Peter Phun Photography

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